Edith Hall Lectures at Gresham

From Gresham….

I thought your network would be interested in a series of three lectures about science in Ancient Greece by the classicist Professor Edith Hall, who’s a visiting Professor at Gresham again this year. Hall is a superb lecturer. The lectures are first-come, first-served, but I should say that for anyone with schools links, we can book some seats for school parties in the main hall.

All of our lectures are live-streamed online so you can watch them at a time and place to suit you.

With best wishes

Lucia Graves

Science in Ancient Greece Edith Hall, Visiting Professor of Classics https://www.gresham.ac.uk/series/science-in-ancient-greece/

Thursday 28 November 2019, 1pm, Barnard’s Inn Hall

Physics: its Birth in Greek Ionia 

The study of the natural and physical world from a scientific viewpoint began in Greek cities on the western coast of Turkey around Miletus in about 600 BCE. The first scientists were known as physiologoi, or men who discoursed about nature (physis). Each tried to put his various observations together in a way that constituted a coherent, unified model. This lecture discusses the pioneering physical theories of Thales, Anaximander, Anaximenes, Anaxagoras and Democritus.

https://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/birth-of-physics

Thursday 5 March 2020, 1pm, Barnard’s Inn Hall

Engineering: Archimedes of Syracuse

In the 3rd century BCE, the Sicilian polymath Archimedes advanced significantly human understanding of mathematics, geometry and astronomy. By applying his discoveries to practical problems and physical phenomena, he became the founder of statics and hydrostatics, demonstrating how levers work and in turn creating unprecedented war machines such as ‘Archimedes’ claw’ and ‘heat-ray’.

https://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/archimedes

Thursday 28 May 2020, 1pm, Barnard’s Inn Hall 

Hippocrates and Ancient Greek Medicine

The birth of rational medicine contributed to the scientific revolution which occurred amongst eastern Greek communities in the 7th-to-5th centuries BCE. Medical professionals still take the oath of the ancient Greek doctor Hippocrates of Kos, preserved along with his medical treatises. They are a consummation of many decades of medical practice and empirical observation, showing methods similar to the eastern Aegean natural scientists in seeking physical causes rather than supernatural explanations for natural phenomena, whether related to geology, weather, disease or injury.   https://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/ancient-greek-medicine