Resources from the School of Classics, University of St Andrews

The School of Classics at the University of St Andrews is developing three sets of online resources for teachers and anyone with an interest in the Greeks and Romans. The first deals with aspects of Greek drama and is keyed to A-level/Highers syllabuses, the second deals with Trajan’s Column and the third presents recent research by staff in the School.  You can find the resources here:

Greek drama in schools

http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/classics/research/impact/greek-drama/

From there you can download the first in a planned series of briefing sheets for teachers that condense recent debates in research scholarship that bear on texts and topics that are taught in school syllabuses. The first document deals with satire and seriousness in Aristophanes. A second briefing sheet is currently in production, and we are looking to cover other areas too, such as Greek and Roman religion. Suggestions (including suggestions for future topics) and comments are very welcome: email classics.impact@st-andrews.ac.uk.

 

Trajan’s Column

http://arts.st-andrews.ac.uk/trajans-column/

This website hosts a clickable and searchable database of Trajan’s Column that gives easy access to a wealth of images of the monument, detailed descriptions of each figure and its equipment, and a collection of short articles about the history, purpose and study of the column. The website is based on more than twenty years’ research and visits to the site by Dr Jon Coulston. Many of the images are his own. The site will eventually host bibliographies, discussion forums and research articles on the column too.

 

Podcasts

http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/classics/research/podcasts/

This series of podcasts presents recent research by staff in the School in accessible format. The podcasts cover a wide range of topics, such as politics and gender conflict in Greek drama, the Olympic Games in the Roman empire, lies and broken promises in ancient and modern democracy, and ethnography and attitudes to ‘barbarians’ and provincials in the Roman west.

 

We hope you find these resources useful. All three sets are under development, so if you have any comments or suggestions, please contact Ralph Anderson on classics.impact@st-andrews.ac.uk.